0120 | Indigo – Marina Warner

If you’re here looking for v4 of the spreadsheet then you’re following a bad link I accidentally posted on the web. The new version of the spreadsheet is HERE

If you really want to read my review of Indigo, check that out below… to be honest though, I wouldn’t bother as the book was terrible 😉


Context: Read this during breaks while studying at the Wycliffe UK centre.

REVIEW
Haven’t read the Tempest by Shakespeare but apparently, this is based on it. Don’t really understand why you’d bother to rewrite Shakespeare. I mean, you can hardly improve on him can you. I read 1000 Acres by Jane Smiley ages ago which was a retelling of King Lear and that was disappointing. Not half as disappointing as this was though.

This is, as far as I’m concerned, a book that merits absolutely no place on the 1001 books list or in fact any books that may be lauded as obligatory reading. I defy anyone to explain to me why this should have a place on the list and the Brothers Karamazov not.

But hey, there I am complaining about the list. Let me confine my complaints to the novel in hand and explain why I think that way.

I didn’t find the narrative at all engaging except for one exception where the early history of the island is mentioned and this lasted all of… if I’m being generous… 75 pages. I also found the characters really shallow and ill-defined, again with the exception of Sycorax and Kit at the early stages of the story.

To sum up, I felt like this is the sketch of a novel, not a novel itself because it simply doesn’t explore the issues to any degree at all leaving characters flat and undeveloped and the narrative a series of half-finished chapters. Dialogue doesn’t seem to add to any purpose and there’s a parody of cricket all the way through it that seems an elementary attempt at The Glass Bead Game. But whereas Hesse had a purpose for describing that game, I didn’t follow what the purpose was for Flinders.

I haven’t read a novel this bad for ages. Onwards and, definitely, upwards…

FIRST LINE
When he wakes up, the fat man finds he’s been tied hand and foot, and something powerful’s smelling all around him.

QUOTES
All sixes and sevens inside, and single outside, this was indeed the postmodern condition…

CLOSING LINE
She’s often too tired nowadays to unscramble the noises, but she’s happy hearing them, to change into stories another time.

RATING:
rubbish | poor | mediocre | okay | good | very good | excellent | superb

ALSO BLOGGED HELPFULLY BY
absolutely nobody that I could find! If you have, please let me kno

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